Lauren Coullard

Si te te sens frémir, meurs, avance, frappe! 

25.02 - 25.04.2022

Text, Lila Torquéo

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_12.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_20.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_21.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_01.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_03.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_15.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Endure Puddle, ventilation grill with collage, 30x30cm, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_18.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_16.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_05.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Crest gel, industrial food, 10x5cm, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_04.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_02.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_08.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Si tu te sens frémir meurs, avance, frappe!, installation view, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_07.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Scabieuse des prés, oil on canvas, 13x9cm, 2021

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_10.jpg

Lauren Coullard,  Boast Burden, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_09.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Quarrel Curse, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022

ARomy_Lauren-Coullard_High-Res_Web_11.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Hedgehog Strategy, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022

crop Stiff Plagued, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022, LaurenCoullard.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Stiff Plagued, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022 / picture Maurine Tric

crop Binder Gasp, acrylic or oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022, LaurenCoullard.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Binder Gasp, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022 / picture Maurine Tric

crop Rows of tattered, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022, LaurenCoullard.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Rows of Tattered, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022 / picture Maurine Tric

crop Load Beareres, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022, LaurenCoullard.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Load Beareres, oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022 / picture Maurine Tric

crop Worshipped Kneel, acrylic on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022, LaurenCoullard.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Worshipped Kneel, acrylic and oil on canvas, 81x65cm, 2022 / picture Maurine Tric

crop Plagued by misfortune, oil and pastel on canvas, 146x114cm, 2021, LaurenCoullard.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Plagued by Misfortune, oil and pastel on canvas, 146x114cm, 2022 / picture Maurine Tric

crop Despied Robbers, 35x27cm, oil on canvas, 2022 Lauren Coullard.jpg

Lauren Coullard, Despied Robbers, oil on canvas, 35x27cm, 2022 / picture Maurine Tric

Pictures Philip Frowein

Si tu te sens frémir, meurs, avance, frappe!

Voices are heard from limbo: "If you feel yourself quivering, die, move forward, strike !" says Eliane Schubert like a rope to grasp on when the body wavers. This character invented by Antoine Volodine in Frères sorcières (1), sole survivor of an itinerant theater troupe, narrates her story of sex slave, kidnapped by a horde of bandits dragging her to her death, which takes her away as soon as her story is transcribed. The poetic vociferations that she keeps nestled in her entrails are the eternal resonances of a song destined to the little sisters of misfortune. 

 

As a desiring researcher, Lauren Coullard tracks down future creatures who personify the negative forces that bite and animate her from within. In the immaculate pavilion of A.ROMY gallery, a frieze of monsters haunting her is displayed. The visceral noise of Antoine Volodine's wandering players that scream madness and obscenity joins her paintings score, each participating in the framework of a chromatic ballet. The words on the other hand withdraw from their dedicated places, impotent in front of the unspeakable horror. Nothing but gravelly slime comes out of the mouths of her inaudible and insatiable creatures, with rough tongues.

 

This procession of frenetic figures begins with images she collects and combines in her collages, corresponding to the embryonic phase of her paintings. From the patterns of these sources that she cuts up, tears up if not eviscerates to recover the heart of the matter, sutured faces are born. She draws up symbiotic entities, "patchworks of genders", to use Jack Halberstam's (2) expression, which see their skin and their swollen flesh hybridizing. For a time, these metamorphoses end in lycanthropes and cyborgs. Loosing control of the liquid that penetrates and pirates his DNA, Wikus, agent of a multinational in District 9, a film by Neil Bonckamp, takes on the appearance of the aliens he tortures. From this infrahuman (3), so qualified by Thierry Hocquet, one does not distinguish the predator from the victim nor sometimes the alienation of the emancipation. 

 

Cyborgs are born from an alternative ground which assumes its own chaos. Sci-Fi authors draw strong figures from garbage, like Gally, the manga heroine in Gunnm. Inhabited by passion and equipped with her serrated Damascus blade, she devotes her cybernetic body and her life frozen in adolescence to combat. "Let's finish this with a bang."

 

Gally is an artificial creature who thwarts the parental model, marking her obsolescence in the paradigm of not only cyborgs but also aliens who take advantage of the human body to bear children. "All women are Aliens (4)" sais Olivia Rosenthal who portrays in her eponymous book Lieutenant Ripley played by Sigourney Weaver. Based on the determination of this eternal survivor of the Alien saga, she makes Ripley the double of the xenomorph. On screen, her bright red human blood mixes with the alien's greenish blood composed of molecular acid. 

 

"Red protects itself. No color is as territorial. It stakes a claim, is on the alert against the spectrum.(5)"
 

Dracanea trees ooze a red resinous substance, called dragon's blood, sanguis dragonis, which heals wounds. Derek Jarman points to the beliefs that gave red healing properties, which explains why Edward II tried to ward off scarlet fever by lining his room with scarlet decorations. In Chroma, a book of colour, Jarman gives us his meditations which he dedicates to the figure of the Harlequin: 

 

"Mercurial trickster, black-masked. Chameleon who takes on every color. Aerial acrobat, jumping, dancing, turning somersaults. Child of chaos. 

 

Many hued and wily 

Changing his skin 

Laughing to his fingertips 

Prince of thieves and cheats 

Breath of fresh air.(6)"

 

In the image of this versatile spirit in costume, Lauren Coullard's paintings diffract the facets of human fever. Perhaps there is a sister of fire within her that cries out to be tamed and avoids being abandoned at all costs to the hands of the unconscious. This captive sister becomes the figure of anguish which, when it is pushed back too far into the darkness, returns burned by the underworld, wearing a blaze as hair. While painting can cast spells, it also serves to welcome and exorcise nightmares because "we need monsters and we need to recognize and celebrate our own monstrosities.(7)" These creatures are revealed by the fire of our own detractors that hypnotizes and encourages us to reach our point of incandescence. In the limbo of the world where the artist ventures, the flames crackle and illuminate these figures that are agitated between the abyss and the ether. 

 

We may have made a mistake in the distribution of roles. From our humanoid point of view, we have comfortably taken ourselves for the public while there can be no one else but us to have frightened or amused these sulfurous strangers who take the features of our reflections. 

1 Antoine Volodine, Frères Sorcières, Paris, Éditions du Seuil, 2019.

2. Judith Halberstam, Skin Shows, Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters, Durham/Londres, Duke University Press, 1995, p.1. 

3. Thierry Hoquet, Les Presque-Humains: Mutants, cyborgs, robots, zombies... et nous, Paris, Seuil, 2021.

4. Olivia Rosenthal, Toutes les femmes sont des Aliens, Paris, Collections Verticales/Gallimard, 2016.5

5. Derek Jarman, Chroma a Book of Color, 1995, New York, The Overlook Press, p.31.

​6 épitaphe du livre, ibidem.
7 “We need monsters and we need to recognize and celebrate our own monstrosities.” Judith Halberstam, op.cit. p.27

Des voix se font entendre depuis les limbes : “Si tu te sens frémir, meurs, avance, frappe !” lance Eliane Schubert comme une corde pour s’accrocher quand le corps vacille. Ce personnage inventé par Antoine Volodine dans Frères sorcières (1), seule survivante d’une troupe de théâtre itinérante, narre son histoire d’esclave sexuelle, kidnappée par une horde de bandits la traînant jusqu’à la mort, qui l’emporte aussitôt son récit retranscrit. Les vociférations poétiques qu’elle garde blotties dans ses entrailles, sont les résonances éternelles d’un chant destiné aux petites sœurs de l’infortune.

En chercheuse désirante, Lauren Coullard traque les futures créatures personnifiant les forces négatives qui la mordent et l’animent de l’intérieur. Au sein du pavillon immaculé de la galerie A.ROMY se déploie une frise de monstres qui la hantent. Le bruit viscéral des baladines d’Antoine Volodine qui gueulent à la folie et à l'obscénité rejoint sa partition de peintures, participant chacune à l’ossature d’un ballet chromatique. Les mots en revanche se retirent de leurs emplacements dédiés, impuissants devant l’horreur innommable. Seule une bave graveleuse sort de la bouche de ses créatures inaudibles et insatiables, aux langues rugueuses.

Ce cortège de figures frénétiques prend pour point de départ son réservoir d’images qu’elle collecte et combine dans ses collages, correspondant à la phase embryonnaire de ses peintures. Des motifs de ces images qu’elle découpe, déchire si ce n’est évide pour en récupérer la substantifique moelle, naissent des visages suturés. Elle dresse des entités symbiotiques, “des patchworks de genres”, pour reprendre l’expression de Jack Halberstam (2), qui voient leur peau et leur chair tuméfiée s'hybrider. Pour un temps, ces métamorphoses s’achèvent sur des êtres lycanthropes et cyborgs. Hors de maîtrise du liquide qui pénètre et pirate son ADN, Wikus, agent d’une multinationale dans District 9, le film de Neil Bonckamp, prend l’apparence des extraterrestes qu’il torture. De cet infrahumain (3), ainsi qualifié par Thierry Hocquet, on ne distingue plus le prédateur de la victime ni parfois l’aliénation de l’émancipation.

Les cyborgs naissent d’un terreau alternatif qui assume son propre chaos. Les auteur·trices de SF puisent dans les ordures des figures fortes à l’instar de Gally, l’héroïne du manga Gunnm. Habitée par la passion et munie de sa lame de Damas dentelée, elle dévoue son corps cybernétique et sa vie figée dans l’adolescence au combat. “Let's finish this with a bang.”

Gally est une créature artificielle qui déjoue le modèle parental, marquant son obsolescence dans le paradigme des cyborgs mais aussi dans celui des aliens qui tirent profit du corps humain pour enfanter. “Toutes les femmes sont des Aliens (4)” d’après Olivia Rosenthal qui dépeint dans son livre éponyme le lieutenant Ripley interprété par Sigourney Weaver. En s’appuyant sur la détermination de cette éternelle rescapée de la saga Alien, elle fait de Ripley le double du xenomorphe. À l'écran, son sang rouge vif d’humaine se mêle au sang verdâtre de l’alien composé d’acide moléculaire.

“Red protects itself. No colour is as territorial. It stakes a claim, is on the alert against the

spectrum.(5)

Les arbres de genre Dracanea suintent une substance résineuse rouge, dite sang-de-dragon, sanguis dragonis, qui soigne les plaies. Derek Jarman met le doigt sur les croyances qui ont donné au rouge des vertus cicatrisantes, ce qui explique pourquoi Edward II tenta de conjurer la scarlatine en tapissant sa chambre de décorations écarlates. Dans Chroma, a book of colour, Jarman nous livre ses méditations qu’il dédie à la figure de l’Arlequin :

“Mercurial trickster, black-masked. Chameleon who takes on every colour. Aerial acrobat, jumping, dancing, turning somersaults. Child of chaos.

 

Many hued and wily Changing his skin Laughing to his fingertips Prince of thieves and cheats Breath of fresh air.(6)

À l'image de cet esprit versatile costumé, les peintures de Lauren Coullard diffractent les facettes de la fièvre humaine. Peut-être y-a-t-il en elle une sœur de feu qui clame et qui ne demande qu’à être apprivoisée pour éviter à tout prix de se faire abandonner aux mains de l’inconscient. Cette sœur captive devient la figure de l’angoisse qui, lorsqu’elle est refoulée trop loin dans les ténèbres, revient brûlée par les enfers, affublée d’un brasier en guise de chevelure. Si la peinture peut jeter des sorts, elle sert aussi à accueillir et à exorciser les cauchemars car “nous avons besoin de monstres et nous avons besoin de reconnaître et de célébrer notre propre monstruosité.(7) ” Ces créatures se révèlent par le feu de nos propres détracteurs qui nous hypnotise et nous incite à atteindre notre point d’incandescence. Aux limbes du monde où l’artiste s’aventure, les flammes crépitent et éclairent ces figures qui s’agitent entre le gouffre et l'éther.

Nous nous sommes d’ailleurs peut-être trompé·es dans la distribution des rôles. De notre point de vue humanoïde, nous nous sommes confortablement pris·es pour le public alors qu’il ne peut y avoir quiconque d’autres que nous pour avoir effrayé ou amusé ces sulfureux étranger·es qui prennent les traits de nos reflets.

1 Antoine Volodine, Frères Sorcières, Paris, Éditions du Seuil, 2019.

2. Judith Halberstam, Skin Shows, Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters, Durham/Londres, Duke University Press, 1995, p.1. 

3. Thierry Hoquet, Les Presque-Humains: Mutants, cyborgs, robots, zombies... et nous, Paris, Seuil, 2021.

4. Olivia Rosenthal, Toutes les femmes sont des Aliens, Paris, Collections Verticales/Gallimard, 2016.5

5. Derek Jarman, Chroma a Book of Color, 1995, New York, The Overlook Press, p.31.

6 épitaphe du livre, ibidem.
7 “We need monsters and we need to recognize and celebrate our own monstrosities.” Judith Halberstam, op.cit. p.27

 

Lila Torquéo